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Zero Harm

Zero ‘Arm

by Dave Collins on July 17, 2014 · 9 comments

in Psychology of Safety and Risk



Zero ‘Arm  Potato Head

zero armMr Safety Potato demonstrating the balancing act of “Zero Arm” with two of our awesome authors Gabrielle Carlton and Robert Sams. This photo was taken today during Unit 4 of the Social Psychology of Risk Grad Cert in the High Reliability Organisation. It is very cold Canberra at the moment but there has been warm times of learning and engagement between everyone. In a few days the students will be on Karl E. Weick overload but re-invigorated to the psychology of risk. Find out more about the course HERE



  • Rob long

    And you should have seen the winning team.

    • Rob Sams

      Was there a winning team? I didn’t notice. Was the game about winning…. A great afternoon of learning, thanks for organising it Rob, I know it must has taken a lot of time and effort

  • Gabrielle Carlton

    Hahaha Dave how did that photo get there? Definitely many Potato Heads in the room this week. Lots of learning, critical thinking and understanding what it takes to be resilient…might have to go and speak with Rob Sams about the sharing of this photo haha

    • http://www.safetyrisk.net Dave Collins

      Armless fun Gab – looking fwd to starting the course next year. And…..will bring my whole team of Potatoes!

    • Rob Sams

      Experiential learning is a great way to ‘feel’ and ‘experience’ things, not just sit in a lecture. Very different to my previous experiences at University. Karl Weick’s work on High Reliability Organisations is great. Our tower didn’t quite win first prize, but we learnt a lot about by-products and trade-offs along the way.

      Gab and I thought we were posing for a winners photo, but it wasn’t to be :-(

      • Dave Collins

        Ahhh so you’re not just training, actually learning while doing fun stuff? You win first prize for abstract architecture mate – bonus points for the potato!

        • Gabrielle Carlton

          Yes Dave learning with a harsh dose of reality mate. It was just a game but quite analogous to any organisation and the inner workings. All good fun.

        • Rob Sams

          The potato proudly had “zero arms’, but we had plenty of ‘incidents’ to help us learn as we went about our building. So many lessons for us all to learn. With this being my first photo with a Mr Potato, do I get to join the club now?

      • Gabrielle Carlton

        Yes Rob our ‘structure’ was probably not the best (although not the worst) it was our collective mindfulness that got us through to the point we enjoyed our learnings. There were many trade offs to consider. These types of experiential learnings really do give us food for thought.

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